You’ll Never Be Too Old – 2 Corinthians 4:16-18

Standing in front of the mirror looking into my aging eyes I warned my reflection she is going to die. You might think I’m crazy if I tell you how liberating it is to accept that message.

The day is coming

How many of the billions of this planet’s inhabitants departed from it without dying? It’s possible Elijah, who traveled in a heavenly chariot, and Enoch, who “walked with God, and he was not, for God took him” (Genesis 5:24 ESV), went into eternity without dying, but the Bible doesn’t come right out and say that. We do know graves account for more people who left this world through death than any other way.

What about losing my abilities?

Once we resolve that we’re going to die we can relax and fix our eyes on Jesus. He’s been there, he stole death’s power over us, and he can lead us safely through the “valley of the shadow.”

So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 ESV

In an earlier post about my mission trip to Zambia I shared my concerns about losing the ability to serve God in ways I am used to. I wrote that I “wondered how I could be useful if I eventually lost the ability to count pills, or hold sick babies, or bounce along bumpy African roads without crying out in pain.”

What would be the point of living if I can’t “do”?

I concluded, “There can be benefits reaped from experiencing disability. One is that our weakness can give someone an opportunity to practice compassion and service.” My existence can still be a blessing.

In a group text recently my kids, most in their thirties, played with an app that aged their faces to eighty-some years plus. My husband added his photo without the changes, saying “no app needed.” No, he doesn’t really look like he’s eighty. My point is we shouldn’t let thoughts of the mode or timing of our departure get us down, because as the psalmist said, “I trust in you, O Lord; I say, ‘You are my God.’ My times are in your hand . . .” (Psalm 31:14-15a ESV).

The eternal vs the temporary

I’ll never be too old to do what he wants me to do. My age, condition and circumstances don’t catch him off guard. He’s God. He knows his plan and it’s all good.

I’ve learned from earlier lessons that we can trust the promises in the Scriptures. We can be content, even if we lose the ability to do what we like, because our lives only contain temporary afflictions. The suffering that clings to us now holds no comparison to what’s coming.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

When There’s Fear in the Shadows – Psalm 23:3-4


Sometimes being in the dark is fun. When I’m playing with my grandchildren I allow my imagination to run a little wild. I jump behind a tree or freeze in the shadows so they won’t easily find me.

sun casting long shadows on green earth through a forest of mature trees

Other times the shadows make me afraid.

I’m in a place now where I don’t know the outcome of my struggles. I follow Jesus and I’m learning his ways, but I don’t know why things are the way they are. Being in the dark may sharpen my senses, but it’s not always fun.

He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.


Psalm 23:3-4 ESV

Why do I so quickly forget how I came to this place? The psalm starts with “The Lord is my shepherd.” I’m walking through the valley of death shadows because this is where my shepherd brought me. We didn’t come by accident.

It also says he’s the restorer of souls and a shepherd who comforts with his rod and staff. I’m sure if I stop focusing on the pounding of my heart I’ll feel his gentle pressure against my shoulder, directing me down the right path. I’m so glad the psalm doesn’t say we’ll stay long. He’s leading me through the valley, not to it.

This place of not seeing clearly may be uncomfortable, but he won’t abandon me to the wolves that call to my fear.

He is with me, he is leading me, and he uses his tools to comfort me. For now, that’s all I need to know.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

Here’s a good plan: Stay close to the shepherd!

Will God Answer all our Questions? – Exodus 4:10-12

Have you heard someone say that they’d like to ask God a few questions? Like why he allows children to be traumatized, war, natural disasters, Alzheimer’s, or ?

Let’s say I’m 90 when I die. I enter heaven with a pencil stuck behind my ear, gripping my cane. In my other hand is a long checklist. I shuffle toward the throne of grace ready to get some answers.

No, that doesn’t work. Let’s get rid of the cane because the book of Revelation says God makes all things new.

So I drop the cane and stroll toward God on new strong, confident legs. I mentally cross off two of my questions but there are more. Yes, I realize I’m no longer 90, but I want to understand a few things about my time on earth anyway.

Then it hits me that I’m also not dead.

I have to stop here. Being not dead is more than I can handle, especially when I look up to see my Lord and my God reaching toward my cheeks to rub the tears off. And I can’t explain the tears because the list in my hands is distracting me.

No, that can’t be right. By this point the list would be soaked by my weeping and I wouldn’t care.

I’ve been studying the book of Exodus this month, and it has made me wonder where the idea that God must account for himself came from. He is God and he’s got a lot more going on in his mind than I could comprehend. And he doesn’t have to say anything.

No one’s going to be marching up to his throne for explanations.

When God told Moses to go to Pharaoh and tell him to set the Hebrews free, Moses didn’t like God’s plan. He wanted the assignment to go to someone else. What follows is an example of God choosing to respond directly.

But Moses said to the Lord, “Oh, my Lord, I am not eloquent, either in the past or since you have spoken to your servant, but I am slow of speech and of tongue.” Then the Lord said to him, “Who has made man’s mouth? Who makes him mute, or deaf, or seeing, or blind? Is it not I, the Lord? Now therefore go, and I will be with your mouth and teach you what you shall speak” (Exodus 4:10-12 ESV).

[There are two things that stand out in your story, Moses. First, if you are slow of speech and tongue, God is already aware of it. He made your mouth so he knows if your slowness is by his design or if you’re stalling. Second, he’s with you. You’ll be fine.]

Here’s another scenario about asking God questions.

Instead of toting a list to God in heaven I imagine myself a hungry teen crossing the threshold into the kitchen hollering what’s for dinner Mom. Her tiny kitchen changes to a high school gym-sized banquet hall with dozens of tables loaded with beautiful, delicious foods of all kinds, (I’m vegan but you can imagine all kinds of meats if you want) fruits, vegetables, desserts. Not all cheap stuff, either. I stall, leaning against the doorpost. Am I going to say hey, Mom, what’s for dinner? No. With a spread like this I’m confident there’s no need to ask.

Let’s eat!

by Kathy Sheldon Davis