Don't Be Embarrassed if You're Still Looking for Your Calling – Matthew 4:19

Sometimes as followers of Jesus we struggle with understanding our calling. We might wonder why we aren’t more successful in our efforts or why we no longer find them fulfilling. What we once excelled at may have changed. Have we missed our calling?

In my thirties I knew I was made to be a mother. I was in my element managing our children and our home, but when we were done expanding our family I went through a terrible time of loss. I reminded God that I was good at this mothering thing and he’d blessed it. I gave it my all and saw good fruit in my family and in our community. Wasn’t this my calling? Why would he take it away?

I talked about these questions in a previous post. You might wish to read When Your Life’s Work Gets the Dreaded Pink Slip – Job 1:21.

How do I know what my calling is?

Have you ever thought that perhaps a calling might be a response instead of an assignment? I mean, repeatedly in Scripture we are told to follow Jesus. I don’t remember Jesus directing anyone to work in a certain field or strive for a particular profession. I’ll keep reading, though, in case I missed something.

He did say to work at whatever we do “as for the Lord,” but that seems to imply that any job can relate to our calling. In fact, in Matthew 4 when he tells his disciples to follow him, he promises that in following him he will make them what he wants them to be.

And he (Jesus) said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

Matthew 4:19 ESV


Since I’m not a fisherman I have to look at the underlying meaning of “fishers of men” to find what it means to me. He’s talking to guys who make their living catching fish. What he’s telling me, a woman who usually works in ways not related to fish, is that he will make me a “bringer of people” to Jesus as I follow him in my daily tasks.

And this, my friend, is our true calling: Follow Jesus and bring others.

What Jesus calls you to do

How we fulfill his calling is our service, our response, to him. It’s our moment by moment choice to look for ways to love others in whatever we do, pointing the way to Jesus as we follow him ourselves.

By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.

John 13:35 ESV

Whether a band leader, an executive, or a homeschool parent your calling is the same as everyone else’s, to follow Jesus. Are you a nurse, a research scientist, a mom, a soldier, or a city council member? He calls you to follow him. If you’re a mechanic or a Walmart cashier, follow Jesus. He will lead us into opportunities to love others like he loves us, making us fishers of men — bringers of people to Jesus.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

You’ll Never Be Too Old – 2 Corinthians 4:16-18

Standing in front of the mirror looking into my aging eyes I warned my reflection she was going to die. You might think I’m crazy if I tell you how liberating it was for me when I accepted that message.

The day is coming

How many of the billions of this planet’s inhabitants departed from it without dying? It’s possible Elijah, who traveled in a heavenly chariot, and Enoch, who “walked with God, and he was not, for God took him” (Genesis 5:24 ESV), went into eternity without dying, but the Bible doesn’t come right out and say that. We do know graves account for more people who left this world through death than any other way.

What about losing my abilities?

Once we resolve that we’re going to die we can relax and fix our eyes on Jesus. He’s been there, he stole death’s power over us, and he can lead us safely through the “valley of the shadow.”

So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 ESV

In an earlier post about my mission trip to Zambia I shared my concerns about losing the ability to serve God in ways I am used to. I wrote that I “wondered how I could be useful if I eventually lost the ability to count pills, or hold sick babies, or bounce along bumpy African roads without crying out in pain.”

What would be the point of living if I can’t “do”?

I concluded, “There can be benefits reaped from experiencing disability. One is that our weakness can give someone an opportunity to practice compassion and service.” My existence can still be a blessing.

In a group text recently my kids, most in their thirties, played with an app that aged their faces to eighty-some years plus. My husband added his photo without the changes, saying “no app needed.” No, he doesn’t really look like he’s eighty. My point is we shouldn’t let thoughts of the mode or timing of our departure get us down, because as the psalmist said, “I trust in you, O Lord; I say, ‘You are my God.’ My times are in your hand . . .” (Psalm 31:14-15a ESV).

The eternal vs the temporary

I’ll never be too old to do what he wants me to do. My age, condition and circumstances don’t catch him off guard. He’s God. He knows his plan and it’s all good.

I’ve learned from earlier lessons that we can trust the promises in the Scriptures. We can be content, even if we lose the ability to do what we like, because our lives only contain temporary afflictions. The suffering that clings to us now holds no comparison to what’s coming.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

I’m Not the Grandma I Thought I Would Be – Philippians 4:12-13

This isn’t how I thought grandparenting would be. My grandmothers and my mom did it so well. My own grand-mothering started out to be much like theirs, but chronic pain soon changed my course.

For a few years I was able to help care for my grandchildren as I thought grandmas should. I carried them, dressed them, caught them when they ran toward the street. I played chase-and-tickle as they toddled around the kitchen. I led them to places of discovery and taught them to be brave when the rooster threatened.

After my first mission trip to Africa, I wrapped chitenge material around my infant grandson and tied him to my back, hoping to carry him down the mile-long road to the mailbox. Afraid I might strangle him, and remembering the four-year-olds in Zambia who did a better job making their siblings comfortable on their backs, I postponed our trip.

In San Angelo I took another grandson on an exploring trek, packing our snacks and water bottles. We made it to the Concho River where we discovered the carcass of a cat which he wanted to touch. I showed him how to poke it with a stick instead. After wilting all day in the Texas heat, we drenched ourselves in the sprinkler when we got home.

After that my arthritis pain slowed me down. I don’t stir cookie dough or lift large pots of spaghetti sauce anymore. My youngest grandchildren won’t remember me chasing them around the house. On our family camping trips I stay close to the trailer while they wander off. It’s easy for me to fall into despair about losing the ability to take part in some of their adventures.

I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. I can do all things through him who strengthens me.

Philippians 4:12-13 ESV

Yet I can be content. I don’t expect I’ll experience suffering at the same level of the apostle Paul, but I’ll draw my strength from Jesus who helps me remain content whatever my state. He really is all I need.

Yesterday I sat on the bleachers for a grandchild’s school band concert. Three rows away my daughter-in-law sat alone, reserving a place for us. I wanted to be near her, but I knew I’d be too uncomfortable to stay long. I stood in the back.

Sometimes staying content is hard. In lack there is also great abundance. I’m sometimes overwhelmed by friends, for one thing, whose love pours out richly toward me. I can face plenty and need, remaining content in either place with the strength he provides.


Whom have I in heaven but you?
    And there is nothing on earth that I desire besides you.
 My flesh and my heart may fail,
    but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.

Psalm 73:25-26 ESV

Visiting Dead Cat Park wasn’t the best part of our day, nor was the impressiveness of my physical abilities the most memorable. What will endure in my grandson’s mind is his grandmother’s love for him. I pray he also recognizes her source of unending joy, strength, and contentment.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis