The Creativity Challenge – Isaiah 43:18-19

During a visit to a medical facility a nurse told me she is not creative. This was after I spotted an odd shape in a tree across the street that looked like ET’s face. She said, “Give me math and science, but ask me to see a face in tree bark? Not my thing.”

Maybe she hadn’t thought about nursing as creative expression. I’m thankful she uses her talents to help bring hope and healing to people. She works to create a new way, her way of doing that.

Earlier this month Jerry and I watched The Chosen, a new series about the life of Jesus. It is a remarkable retelling of events in the New Testament, but what sets this version apart is

  • it’s a series. I’m sure these stories have never been presented as a series before, and
  • it’s crowd funded. I have never heard of Christian shows being funded this way.

We don’t own a TV, and I don’t like watching videos on my cell phone, but we can view them on our laptop. Viewing TV shows on a computer screen is another thing that was once a “never been done” idea.

The challenge I’m issuing is this: Let’s stop shrinking back from seeing, tasting, making, hearing, and learning new things. We might just open the way for the miraculous.

Remember not the former things, nor consider the things of old. Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert.

Isaiah 43:18-19 ESV

What’s the worst that can happen if the new thing doesn’t succeed? We start again and create a different thing.

Check out the powerful message in The Chosen. I’d like to hear what you think.

Kathy Sheldon Davis

You’ll Never Be Too Old – 2 Corinthians 4:16-18

Standing in front of the mirror looking into my aging eyes I warned my reflection she was going to die. You might think I’m crazy if I tell you how liberating it was for me when I accepted that message.

The day is coming

How many of the billions of this planet’s inhabitants departed from it without dying? It’s possible Elijah, who traveled in a heavenly chariot, and Enoch, who “walked with God, and he was not, for God took him” (Genesis 5:24 ESV), went into eternity without dying, but the Bible doesn’t come right out and say that. We do know graves account for more people who left this world through death than any other way.

What about losing my abilities?

Once we resolve that we’re going to die we can relax and fix our eyes on Jesus. He’s been there, he stole death’s power over us, and he can lead us safely through the “valley of the shadow.”

So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 ESV

In an earlier post about my mission trip to Zambia I shared my concerns about losing the ability to serve God in ways I am used to. I wrote that I “wondered how I could be useful if I eventually lost the ability to count pills, or hold sick babies, or bounce along bumpy African roads without crying out in pain.”

What would be the point of living if I can’t “do”?

I concluded, “There can be benefits reaped from experiencing disability. One is that our weakness can give someone an opportunity to practice compassion and service.” My existence can still be a blessing.

In a group text recently my kids, most in their thirties, played with an app that aged their faces to eighty-some years plus. My husband added his photo without the changes, saying “no app needed.” No, he doesn’t really look like he’s eighty. My point is we shouldn’t let thoughts of the mode or timing of our departure get us down, because as the psalmist said, “I trust in you, O Lord; I say, ‘You are my God.’ My times are in your hand . . .” (Psalm 31:14-15a ESV).

The eternal vs the temporary

I’ll never be too old to do what he wants me to do. My age, condition and circumstances don’t catch him off guard. He’s God. He knows his plan and it’s all good.

I’ve learned from earlier lessons that we can trust the promises in the Scriptures. We can be content, even if we lose the ability to do what we like, because our lives only contain temporary afflictions. The suffering that clings to us now holds no comparison to what’s coming.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

When There’s Fear in the Shadows – Psalm 23:3-4


Sometimes being in the dark is fun. When I’m playing with my grandchildren I allow my imagination to run a little wild. I jump behind a tree or freeze in the shadows so they won’t easily find me.

sun casting long shadows on green earth through a forest of mature trees

Other times the shadows make me afraid.

I’m in a place now where I don’t know the outcome of my struggles. I follow Jesus and I’m learning his ways, but I don’t know why things are the way they are. Being in the dark may sharpen my senses, but it’s not always fun.

He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.


Psalm 23:3-4 ESV

Why do I so quickly forget how I came to this place? The psalm starts with “The Lord is my shepherd.” I’m walking through the valley of death shadows because this is where my shepherd brought me. We didn’t come by accident.

It also says he’s the restorer of souls and a shepherd who comforts with his rod and staff. I’m sure if I stop focusing on the pounding of my heart I’ll feel his gentle pressure against my shoulder, directing me down the right path. I’m so glad the psalm doesn’t say we’ll stay long. He’s leading me through the valley, not to it.

This place of not seeing clearly may be uncomfortable, but he won’t abandon me to the wolves that call to my fear.

He is with me, he is leading me, and he uses his tools to comfort me. For now, that’s all I need to know.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

Here’s a good plan: Stay close to the shepherd!