Traveling with a Sock – Hebrews 7:25

If you want to be pulled aside by security in an airport, put a sock filled with flax seeds in your luggage. I didn’t expect such a thing to be so interesting to TSA, but it was, raising eyebrows both times it passed under their scanners.

Why the sock? Well, my therapist told me it could help with arthritis pain in my back and neck. Since I had 15 lbs. of flax seed at home to support my vegan diet, and some white athletic socks that no one uses anymore, I followed his advice. I poured a couple quarts of seeds into a sock, tied a knot in the end, and slept on it.

photo courtesy of jeshoots-com at pixabay

I’ve been using my flax seed pillow for months – and it really does help. I couldn’t part with it when I packed for my trip to Ohio last week, so into my carry-on bag it went.

Though I figured it might look strange to security, I didn’t expect it to be a conversation starter. One agent seemed to appreciate encountering something unique during her assembly-line style work day. “Tell me about this,” propping my sock up with both hands as though holding a sleepy kitten.

Another shared his own pillow ingredient for pain relief – rice.

I should have asked what they imagined my sock might contain. At any rate, they did their job seeing to the safety of thousands of passengers flowing through their gates that day.

At one airport, I allowed my wheeled carry-on to be stowed with the checked-in luggage. I didn’t like being without my emergency supplies (change of clothes, Bible, toiletries, you know . . . ) so I bought a tote bag with pink flowers and Ohio printed on the side, collected a few of my most important things, and packed them before boarding the next plane.

I hadn’t thought about the weight.

In Detroit’s international airport I carried my new tote alternately in my arms and on each shoulder for miles, setting it down at every opportunity on the human conveyors sliding me forward. It took me three days to get over the extra, you guessed it, pain exacerbated by the weight of my therapy pillow.


. . . he (Jesus) is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them.

Hebrews 7:25 ESV

Jesus doesn’t need scanners to know what’s in the baggage I drag through life. And because he’s my high priest and lives forever, as the verses in Hebrews 7 state, I can have no greater security. He is able to save, period.

I like to separate, in Scripture, which parts are my responsibility and which are not. Who is Jesus able to save? The ones who draw near to God through him. Staying close to him, however, might be easier if leave more stuff at home.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

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Speaking of carrying less weight, let me point you toward BibleGateway.com. You can read and study the Bible anywhere you go, and it’s much lighter than books or socks filled with seeds.

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A New Way to Enjoy the Bible – Psalm 150

I love studying the Bible. This year I found a new way to help others with their Bible reading. It’s called the Bible Gateway Blogger Grid.

Icon indicating a Bible Gateway Blogger Grid Member

The Grid, hashtag #bgbg2, contains a list of bloggers whose posts include references to the Bible and are linked to BibleGateway.com, the most visited Christian website in the world (with over 150 million views per month).

I’ve been using BibleGateway.com as a resource for several years now. It helps me confirm I’m quoting verses correctly, and I can compare multiple translations. And there are many other features on the site as well. I’m honored to link my blog with them.

This morning I stumbled upon Psalm 150 and couldn’t pass by it without responding. (I’m praising quietly, though; someone I love is still in bed.)

Praise the Lord! Praise God in his sanctuary;
    praise him in his mighty heavens!
Praise him for his mighty deeds;
    praise him according to his excellent greatness!
Praise him with trumpet sound;
    praise him with lute and harp!
Praise him with tambourine and dance;
    praise him with strings and pipe!
Praise him with sounding cymbals;
    praise him with loud clashing cymbals!
Let everything that has breath praise the Lord!
Praise the Lord!”


Psalm 150 ESV

I’m praising him for the ability to read and write and know him. Praise the Lord!

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

Will God Answer all our Questions? – Exodus 4:10-12

Have you heard someone say that they’d like to ask God a few questions? Like why he allows children to be traumatized, war, natural disasters, Alzheimer’s, or ?

Let’s say I’m 90 when I die. I enter heaven with a pencil stuck behind my ear, gripping my cane. In my other hand is a long checklist. I shuffle toward the throne of grace ready to get some answers.

No, that doesn’t work. Let’s get rid of the cane because the book of Revelation says God makes all things new.

So I drop the cane and stroll toward God on new strong, confident legs. I mentally cross off two of my questions but there are more. Yes, I realize I’m no longer 90, but I want to understand a few things about my time on earth anyway.

Then it hits me that I’m also not dead.

I have to stop here. Being not dead is more than I can handle, especially when I look up to see my Lord and my God reaching toward my cheeks to rub the tears off. And I can’t explain the tears because the list in my hands is distracting me.

No, that can’t be right. By this point the list would be soaked by my weeping and I wouldn’t care.

I’ve been studying the book of Exodus this month, and it has made me wonder where the idea that God must account for himself came from. He is God and he’s got a lot more going on in his mind than I could comprehend. And he doesn’t have to say anything.

No one’s going to be marching up to his throne for explanations.

When God told Moses to go to Pharaoh and tell him to set the Hebrews free, Moses didn’t like God’s plan. He wanted the assignment to go to someone else. What follows is an example of God choosing to respond directly.

But Moses said to the Lord, “Oh, my Lord, I am not eloquent, either in the past or since you have spoken to your servant, but I am slow of speech and of tongue.” Then the Lord said to him, “Who has made man’s mouth? Who makes him mute, or deaf, or seeing, or blind? Is it not I, the Lord? Now therefore go, and I will be with your mouth and teach you what you shall speak” (Exodus 4:10-12 ESV).

[There are two things that stand out in your story, Moses. First, if you are slow of speech and tongue, God is already aware of it. He made your mouth so he knows if your slowness is by his design or if you’re stalling. Second, he’s with you. You’ll be fine.]

Here’s another scenario about asking God questions.

Instead of toting a list to God in heaven I imagine myself a hungry teen crossing the threshold into the kitchen hollering what’s for dinner Mom. Her tiny kitchen changes to a high school gym-sized banquet hall with dozens of tables loaded with beautiful, delicious foods of all kinds, (I’m vegan but you can imagine all kinds of meats if you want) fruits, vegetables, desserts. Not all cheap stuff, either. I stall, leaning against the doorpost. Am I going to say hey, Mom, what’s for dinner? No. With a spread like this I’m confident there’s no need to ask.

Let’s eat!

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

Stay the Course, Telling the Heart of the Story – 1 Kings 13:15-32

What should I do if someone disagrees with the path I’ve chosen? I know what God wants me to do: Love the Lord my God with all my heart, soul, mind, strength, and love my neighbor as myself. One way I express this love is in my writing. Love is his command, writing is my response. But what if a person I trust directs me a different way?

While reading 1 Kings 13 this week I contemplated the part that two prophets played in the story. One, a man of God from Judah, and the other an older prophet. The older prophet disputed what God told the man of God to do. He lied, claiming God told him to instruct the man of God to change his course. The man of God believed the lie and disobeyed God’s command, which led to his death.

Isn’t the older prophet responsible?

What bothers me is that the older prophet’s part in the man of God’s downfall isn’t addressed. Not one word–even though the older prophet confronts the sin that he enabled. Did he carry no guilt for his part in his fellow prophet’s downfall?

I don’t know the answer to that, but I do know whatever God does is just. I can certainly trust him.

Sticking with my story

My takeaway is that I need to stay on course. The writer of 1 Kings 13 focused on the man of God’s path, not the old prophet’s. If there’s another story to tell, it will come in a different chapter, from another writer, or at another time.

I’m to plow ahead in obedience, even if someone more experienced attempts to direct my path differently. Managing my response to the distraction of dissenting voices is a huge part of living. It’s good to listen to the opinions of those we trust, but I need to be careful to only let God change my course.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

Confession and Prayer Brings Healing – James 5:13-16

Until a few months ago some of my cousins had been out of touch with each other for decades. When two of them recently moved to Lane County, we arranged to meet at the Camas Country Mill and Bakery. It didn’t take us long to find ourselves delighted with all things old, the ancient schoolhouse with its furnishings and our childhood tales.

As we reconnected, the teasing and silliness escalated until it bordered on being ridiculous. Should people our age act like they’re still thirteen?

I sipped my tea and chased chickpeas around my salad plate until I spotted names, dates, and initials carved on a weathered wall not far from our table. This fascinated me because the boards had been salvaged from the building’s exterior. Diners now enjoy their meal while examining evidence of former students’ vandalism. I traced one date with my finger: 1900.

We were told a few names belong to people, or their descendants, still living in the area.

How would I like my misdeeds put on display for a hundred years, my name listed with those who have damaged public property? I realize they were probably young children, someone else may have been the culprit, or that it may now be considered art or an entertaining story. Still . . .

I don’t like the thought of someone judging me while chewing their sandwich, but maybe bringing my failures into the open is a good thing. Perhaps removing the façade and revealing underlying scars is healthy.

“Is anyone among you suffering? Let him pray. Is anyone cheerful? Let him sing praise. Is anyone among you sick? Let them call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. And the prayer of faith will save the one who is sick, and the Lord will raise him up. And if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven. Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working” (James 5:13-16 ESV).

Maybe in the future our descendants will get a good laugh about our misadventures. Hopefully, there will be a lot to admire, too. Like our honesty.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis