Prayer for Healing in 2018 – James 5:13-16

Don’t laugh if you see me in the pool rolling and turning like a dying goldfish. I’m OK, really. I call this my workout, and it does me a lot of good. Those younger or more athletic probably don’t comprehend how my slow movements qualify as a real workout, but water fitness makes a world of difference to me. When I’m in the water I find myself unburdening my heart, singing, and even dancing as I push against the water.

This week I’ve been reading the book of James, written by one of Jesus’s brothers. Until now I hadn’t seen how confession and other people’s prayers also relate to health.

“Is any one of you in trouble? He should pray. Is anyone happy? Let him sing songs of praise. Is any one of you sick? He should call the elders of the church to pray over him and anoint him with oil in the name of the Lord. And the prayer offered in faith will make the sick person well; the Lord will raise him up. If he has sinned, he will be forgiven. Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be  healed. The prayer of a righteous man is powerful and effective” (James 5:13-16 NIV).

We know it’s important to pray for the salvation of the world, but what about asking for God’s help with the internal battles—with selfishness, fear, greed, idolatry, arrogance, and bitterness? If we confessed these things, maybe the world would become a better place. Certainly humbling ourselves, being open about our problems, and asking others to pray for our health will facilitate healing.

In a few hours 2017 will come to an end and a new year will start. Let’s sharpen our focus in the months ahead, because when we stand righteous before God, our prayers are powerful.

Happy New Year!

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

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He Carries You – Isaiah 46:1-4

We were riding in a cycle rickshaw in India when I realized that Jerry and I put a significant burden on the man who gripped the handle bars. Laboring to maneuver us through Lucknow’s busy streets, we watched his thin legs work hard to get us to our destination. I was concerned he might break a leg or fall off the bike. How I wanted to fix a good meal for the undernourished soul.

Earlier that week we’d toured Delhi, passing temples to different gods and shops offering idols for sale. The small bus that carted us around felt much safer than the rickshaws, especially when we passed overloaded wagons swaying as the livestock plodded along.

This morning I found these verses in Isaiah that brought me comfort.

“. . . their idols are on beasts and livestock; these things you carry are borne as burdens on weary beasts. They stoop; they bow down together; they cannot save the burden, but themselves go into captivity.

“‘Listen to me, O house of Jacob, all the remnant of the house of Israel, who have been borne by me from before your birth, carried from the womb; even to your old age I am he, and to gray hairs I will carry you. I have made, and I will bear; I will carry and will save'” (Isaiah 46:1-4 ESV).

Our God carries us, we don’t carry him. We’re his burden, he isn’t ours. And he’s far stronger than our friends in India.

Thank you, strong and mighty One, you haven’t dropped us yet!

by Kathy Sheldon Davis

Making a Dramatic Lifestyle Change – Isaiah 43:19-21

When I prepared to leave home after graduating high school, it was like throwing my toothbrush and jacket into a backpack and taking off for the wilderness. Did I really understand what I was doing? I was also concerned I might not like what I found when I reached my destination.

Where am I going?

Living as an independent adult wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be.

My grandparents had recently moved to a house on Almaden Street, and I entertained the idea of claiming their basement room for myself. It was damp and musty, empty but for two box crates stacked in the corner. I arranged them under the tiny window, planning to decorate them with dandelions in a tin can.

At some point I’d put a mattress on the floor. I could live without furniture, for a while anyway. I would eat brown rice and split peas . . . and well, I could get along without lots of things.

It sounded like a great idea, “roughing it,” spending time alone with God and not having to put up with other people and their problems.

My fantasy lasted about 7 hours.

When I came to my senses I marked out a different path. Living and caring only for myself wasn’t going to be good. I recognized my true life goal is to follow Jesus where he leads—to sacrificial love for others.

A way in the wilderness

I recently found myself taking an unexpected turn on my path, which involves working to improve my health. After a physical exam I read several books to compare professional opinions. I’ve been eating a whole foods, plant-based diet now for one year and ten days, and I’m thankful to say it’s helping me manage arthritis pain without prescription drugs.

“I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert. The wild beasts will honor me, the jackals and the ostriches, for I give water in the wilderness, rivers in the desert, to give drink to my chosen people, the people whom I formed for myself that they might declare my praise” (Isaiah 43:19b-21 ESV).

Whatever comes on our life’s path, we can trust him to make a way.

by Kathy Sheldon Davis